Result list 10 April 2021

The results of our April 10 sale are now online. Unsold items can be obtained in our aftersale until May 9 (first come, first served). .

Lotnumber: 539
LONDON. Paper with 3 insurance premium receipts. black. No 1538. Folds. The Amicable Society was established in 1706 under a charter of Queen Anne and is arguably the first mutual life assurance society established in the world. Its scheme was designed by John Hartey, bookseller of Fleet Street. William Talbot, Bishop of Oxford, was also among the society's initial supporters. From 1716 onwards, the serpent and the dove became the symbol of the company. In the beginning, the insurance scheme was quite simple. A maximum of 2000 society members aged from 12 to 45 paid an annual contribution of £6 4s each, and at the end of the year the contributions, less running costs, were divided between representatives of members who had died during that year. It also offered annuities. In 1807 the society obtained a newcharter to broaden its claims and adopt the improved methods used by rival offices. Premiums were no longer subject to a fixed price, but varied depending on the age and circumstances of the member. Subsequently, the number of members continuously increased from 4000 in 1790 to 32 000 in 1836. In 1864 the directors felt that their progress was hampered by the terms of the charters and looked for a more progressive company to take over its funds and liabilities. In 1866 they were allowed by Parliament to merge with the Norwich Union Life Insurance Society. This is now a subsidiary of Aviva, the 5th largest insurance group in the world with 57 000 employees serving 45 million customers worldwide. These very early premium receipts show the company seal, of course, and are for three quarterly premiums on the policy on the life of Rev. Robert Thorp. Near perfect condition. The only paper we have seen of this company, the world's first mutual life insurance company.
Themes: BEFORE 1800
GREAT BRITAIN
Date: 27 April 1793
Quality: VF-EF
Startprice: € 100